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On a hike in the coffee plantation

On a hike in the coffee plantation

Yes, but then so, then it will happen. Hiking in coffee plantation with subsequent coffee roasting. I have always given up believing that it is too touristy. But at least I did not go down without explaining myself first.

Samuel my guide meets up in the village. As we walk away to his father’s coffee farm, he talks about village life, about plants and medicinal plants. There is a large super soft leaf that is used as toilet paper for example;). And in the village you have your own court with rules outside the law. Such as the fact that you have to visit the elderly.

Hiking in coffee plantation with subsequent coffee roasting. I have always given up believing that it is too touristy. But at least I did not go down without explaining myself first.

Chameleons with horns

The fields are covered with man-high corn sticks that will soon be harvested. It is dried and ground down to become “ugali”, the corn flour that is ubiquitous for Africa, which is boiled into a solid porridge and eaten with sauce, fish, vegetables or whatever is available for the day. In addition, of course, a lot of coffee bushes. In addition, I get to see two different chameleons. And I learned that the male has horns.

Eventually, after 1 hour of varied hiking, we reach Samuel’s farm. I think. It turns out to be the coffee farm itself. This coffee farm is part of a cooperative of 50 small farms. Samuel takes me through the whole process. And it’s really interesting. Who could believe! They have their own cows and I wonder why it is so wet around them. Because they collect the feces that become energy to power the coffee farm. So two cross jobs is to create energy! (and after a while they are allowed to move back to the dry).

1 cup of coffee = 50 beans

For 1 cup of coffee, 50 beans are needed and there are different qualities (and here comes a home ice cream: Starbucks buys the discarded beans and adds coffee flavor to compensate, said Samuel, who himself meets the agents when they arrive). The farm produces 1.5 tons of coffee per year and 1 kg of coffee beans is sold for about SEK 45. The starting price after coffee roasting is about SEK 150 per kg. And it’s worth it! Now that I’ve met Tanzanian coffee, I do not want anything else. Would be Ethiopian then, it beats everything.

Kahawa kafferosteri

They sell beans to various companies. One of them is Kahawa (coffee in Swahili) which also has a factory where you roast, package, market and sell. Does not look like a factory directly. More a home with a house for the coffee job. Small scale and nice. They have 4 different grids: light, medium, french, dark. Homemade spice cake and coffee are offered. Feeling satisfied I finally did this coffee walk. Although I was even more satisfied when I got to ride a motorcycle taxi all the way down the mountain.

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